Linear Perspectives: The Last Supper

As the flagship of the Linear Perspectives series, Linear Perspectives: The Last Supper aims at recreating da Vinci's famous fresco in a simple and clean way. Leaving all the convoluting details that may obscure the meaning of a work behind, this painting features simplistic and efficient brushstrokes to bring the viewer a straightforward and candid representation of Christ and the apostles sharing the Last Supper as depicted by da Vinci.

36x24 in (60.9x91.4 cm)
2015, oil on canvas

“Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.”

- Leonardo da Vinci

Linear Perspectives: The Scream

“I painted only memories, adding nothing, no details that I did not see. Hence the simplicity of the paintings, their emptiness.”

- Edvard Munch

As the second installment of the Linear Perspectives series, Linear Perspectives: The Scream offers a simplistic take on Edvard Munch's iconic expressionist painting. Retaining the recognizable facial expression of the four original versions, this adaptation calls to mind the uncanny emotions delivered by the original strong jarring brushstrokes but in the familiar minimalistic style of the Linear Perspectives series.

12x16 in (30.4x40.6 cm)
2015, oil on canvas

Linear Perspectives: Whistler's Mother

“The best part of beauty is that which no picture can express.”

- Francis Bacon

In the fourth addition to the Linear Perspective series, Musgrove returns to the Renaissance era to recreate Sandro Botticelli's famous tempera painting, The Birth of Venus. Using the same iconic minimalistic approach seen throughout many of his works, Musgrove demonstrates that less is truly more. Without arbitrary details, the viewer can still fully grasp the tone and embrace the emotion delivered in the original work.

28x22 in (71.1x55.8 cm)
2015, oil on canvas

Linear Perspectives: American Gothic

Grant Wood's classic painting American Gothic is one of the most famous works of art ever created. Naturally, it has become the choice for the fifth addition to D.L.Musgrove's Linear Perspectives series. Wood's original work is already known for its simplicity, yet in an audacious move, D.L.Musgrove further simplified American Gothic into an even cleaner, crisper image, while still retaining the emotion and tone of the original portrait.

16x20 in (40.6x50.8 cm)
2015, oil on canvas

"To say to the painter that Nature is to be taken as she is, is to say to the player that he may sit on the piano.”

- James Whistler

Linear Perspectives: The Birth of Venus

In the third installment of the Linear Perspectives series, D.L.Musgrove constructs another stunning minimalistic adaptation of a classic work, this time James Whistler's classic painting, Arrangement in Grey and Black No. 1. Better known by its common title, Whistler's Mother, the original oil painting conveys a serious tone, depicting its title subject in dull hues and dim lighting. In Linear Perspectives: Whistler's Mother, Musgrove uses a combination of color and form to recreate the renowned masterpiece in the recognizable style of the Linear Perspectives series, maintaining the modesty of Whistler's own brushstrokes while adding the creative twist of avant-garde minimalism.

20x16 in (50.8x40.6 cm)
2015, oil on canvas

“The goal of art was the vital expression of self.”

- Alfred Stieglitz

Linear Perspectives: The Old Guitarist

Filled with emotion in every stroke of the brush, Pablo Picasso finished The Old Guitarist in early 1904. One-hundred and eleven years later, D.L.Musgrove took the same emotions and passion and transformed it into the sixth installment in the Linear Perspectives series. Linear Perspectives: The Old Guitarist demonstrates the same exact feelings of despair, agony, and sorrow as the original masterpiece while also demonstrating that these same emotions can be expressed in a minimalistic manner equally well without the use of complex and distracting details. The candid brushstrokes in D.L.Musgrove's version complement the same posture, movement, and expression in the original, all the while keeping the nature of the work straight forward and concise

16x20 in (40.6x50.8cm)
2015, oil on canvas

“The artist is a receptacle for emotions that come from all over the place: from the sky, from the earth, from a scrap of paper, from a passing shape, from a spider's web.”

- Pablo Picasso

Linear Perspectives: The Creation of Adam

"A man paints with his brains and not with his hands.”

- Michelangelo

 

Linear Perspectives: Napoleon Crossing the Alps

“In the arts the way in which an idea is rendered, and the manner in which it is expressed, is much more important than the idea itself.”

- Jacques-Louis David


 

In the early sixteenth century, Michelangelo painted The Creation of Adam as part of a series of frescoes decorating the walls and ceiling of the Sistine Chapel. More than five-hundred years later, D.L.Musgrove recreates the iconic piece as the seventh installment in the Linear Perspectives series. Using bold and austere lines, he keeps the celebrated spark of the original painting while transforming the imagery into a minimalistic masterpiece. Keeping the same expressions and postures as the original fresco, Linear Perspectives: The Creation of Adam allows viewers to experience the acclaimed scene while doing away with the superfluous details.

36x24 in (91.4x60.9 cm)
2016, oil on canvas

When Napoleon crossed through the Great St. Bernard Pass in the spring of 1800, Jacques-Louis David was inspired to depict the scene in oil on canvas. More than two centuries later, this famous depiction of the crossing inspired D.L.Musgrove to depict it himself in his eighth installment in the Linear Perspectives series. Using bold brushstrokes, he creates a masterpiece equestrian portrait that illustrates a complex and regal scene with a simple and candid approach. Linear Perspectives: Napoleon Crossing the Alps stands as a testament to the audacious concepts of minimalism, striving to show more through less.

16x20 in (40.6x50.8cm)
2016, oil on canvas